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Five things every business manager should know about file sharing practices

A blog written by Jeff Whitney, vice president of marketing for Ipswitch File Transfer

Businesses face a real threat – their employees. That’s right, increasingly tech-savvy employees have turned to a diverse range of file transfer tools that are beyond the sight of IT management.

Employee File Sharing FactsEmployees see webmail, file sharing services, cloud storage, USB sticks and smart devices as easier to use than traditional corporate tools to transfer files. But this trend ignores the security risks and regulatory implications of using file transfer methods entirely outside of corporate control.

Here’s five things you should know about your employees’ habits and the need for secure file transfer technology:

1. Insecure means are used to send confidential files.  Recent surveys we have run to monitor user behaviour found that a vast majority (84%) of respondents send classified or confidential information through corporate email attachments. Of those, 72% do this at least weekly and 52% daily. That means employees are using unsanctioned tools in record numbers, resulting in a lack of visibility and control.

2. Many employees use personal email to send company documents and data.  Users may think they can’t afford delays or slowdowns associated with jumping through perceived hoops to send out information and files that keep business humming. And if the business doesn’t provide the tools they need to send large and confidential attachments, or if the processes and technologies are too difficult to use, then users will take matters into their own hands – and their own email.

3. Employees are using consumer-grade file transfer services for business purposes.  If the corporate email system limits the size of file attachments or if IT vetoes service requests, resourceful employees don’t throw up their hands in resignation: they look for workarounds. And the growing popularity of file transfer sites and cloud services aimed at consumers is making it easier for business users to sidestep IT. More than half of the users we surveyed admitted they use these services.

4. Risk of data theft is high.  When business users aren’t turning to personal email accounts or free file-sharing services, they may be putting files on USB thumb drives, smartphones or other external devices. Unfortunately, our market research shows that almost one-third of users had lost a USB device, smartphone or other external device containing business or personal information – a tremendous risk for any organisation.

5. IT Management Visibility into Data Management is Low, Putting Businesses at Risk.  Most companies create and maintain policies that mandate the use of approved tools for moving and sharing information. However, our research shows fewer than 32% strictly enforce these policies, making these mandates largely meaningless. No visibility means no compliance with internal policies or external regulations and laws.

The file sharing habits of employees can be risky but is driven by their desire to get work done. The business need and IT desire to control file sharing is equally important. Fortunately, companies don’t have to choose between risky behaviour and productivity. Using secure file transfer technology, employees can get the convenience, ease-of-use, and speed they need while IT and the business get the control, visibility, security and compliance they need.

Click here to download a free report, published by Ipswitch File Transfer that provides insights into causes and trends in risky data and file sharing, ways in which IT has fallen behind in safeguarding information, plus the associated dangers and proven means to safeguard corporate data without impeding user productivity.

Pro2col are a certified Ipswitch File Transfer Elite Reseller and have been working with Ipswitch since 2010 to supply, deploy and support their range of managed file transfer solutions to UK businesses.  If you like more information on secure managed file transfer, don’t hesitate to contact us.

 

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Ipswitch MOVEit Ad Hoc shortlisted for SC Magazine Technology Award

Ipswitch File Transfer MOVEit Ad Hoc has been shortlisted by SC Magazine for a Technology Award in the category of ‘Best SME Security Solution’. Our secure person-to-person file transfer solution has been recognised among the most innovative products addressing the security demands of smaller enterprises today. Winners will be announced at the SC Magazine Europe Awards on 23 April, to be held at London’s Hilton Park Lane.

MOVEit Ad Hoc ensures secure sending and receiving of sensitive files and messages between individuals and groups. It provides peace of mind for businessesSC Awards sharing mission critical digital information with their employees, partners and customers using Outlook or any simple browser interface. A recent Ipswitch study reveals that more than a third of people sharing information are doing so insecurely, through personal email or consumer file-sharing sites. MOVEit Ad Hoc provides a simple yet secure solution to sharing files which avoids this increasingly prevalent risky behaviour.

For over 20 years Ipswitch has been a leader in providing secure Managed File Transfer solutions. So it is an honour to be recognised by SC Magazine, not just for ourselves, but on behalf of the many businesses and industries that already depend upon Ipswitch File Transfer to protect their most valuable and sensitive information. It’s also particularly rewarding for MOVEit Ad Hoc to be recognised on the heels of our recent launch – our easy-to-use, IT-approved, person to person file transfer solution.

SC Magazine is the world’s largest dedicated IT security publication, serving the industry for over 15 years. The SC Awards Europe is among the most coveted and prestigious accolades for the information security industry, honouring vendors that deliver the most innovative security technologies.

A panel of industry judges from the information security profession will now pass judgement on the products and services put before them, including Ipswitch File Transfer MOVEit Ad Hoc. Review the shortlist for every category here. Read the latest awards build-up and coverage here. Book tickets for the event here, and find out more about MOVEit Ad Hoc here.

Guest Blog by Jeff  Whitney, Vice President of MarketingIpswitch File Transfer

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Socitm 2012: Managed File Transfer for Councils

We’ve been working closely with councils throughout the UK to simplify, secure and streamline their file transfer, so we couldn’t miss the opportunity to attend Socitm 2012; the No. 1 UK ICT event for councils.  The conference has kicked off today (here’s a breakdown of the programme) and the Pro2col team are ready and waiting to share the knowledge and experience that we have gained from working with councils to secure person-to-person file transfers and automate the movement of sensitive data into and out of the organisation.

Pro2col Managed File Transfer at Socitm 2012

On a similar note, this is the ideal moment to publically release our lastest e-book: The Council’s Guide to Secure Managed File Transfer, which is now available for download.  It covers a range of issues surrounding the secure movement within councils including:

  • How to eliminate the problems caused when employees resort to insecure, non-compliant file transfer methods such as email.
  • Ensuring you meet with UK data security and compliance legislation including The Data Protection Act and PCI DSS.
  • Providing your employees with a quick and simple way to send and receive sensitive files both internally and with third parties.
  • Automating the transfer of files, saving time and money.
  • How to regain control over file transfer processes and user access.

If you’re at the conference and would like to speak to one of our managed file transfer experts, drop by stand 8 (piccy attached) – we’re always happy to help.  If you’ve not been able to make it this year and you’d like to talk to us, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with the office on 0333 123 1240.

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Planning Considerations for Managed File Transfer in 2011

If you’re considering implementing a managed file transfer solution during 2011 then you’re in luck.  Pro2col has been lobbying Ipswitch’s marketing team to provide a web cast specifically for the UK marketplace to address the considerations that should be taken into account when planning the implementation of a managed file transfer solution.

We’re very pleased to announce that Jonathan Lampe, Vice President of Product Management at Ipswitch File Transfer will be hosting a webinar titled, “Learn how and why MFT should fit into your IT structure, as well as insights into top security, compliance and data breach concerns.”  Jonathan will also be discussing;

  • Smart steps to lower your data breach risk
  • Tips on the “person-to-person” aspect of Managed File Transfer
  • How to evaluate, select, and implement a MFT solution with rapid time-to-value and a positive ROI
  • Strategic approach to MFT project planning

The webinar will take place on Wednesday 26th January at 3.00 pm.

REGISTRATION FOR THIS EVENT IS NOW CLOSED.

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Ipswitch MOVEit DMZ Managed File Transfer Review

SC Magazine have reviewed a number of managed file transfer solutions available in the marketplace – Ipswitch MOVEit DMZ being one of them. This managed file transfer server software helps secure data in transit by encrypting various transfer protocols using industry standards.

After reviewing product attributes such as features, ease of use, performance, documentation, support and value for money, Ipswitch MOVEit DMZ was award a full 5 stars in every category and labelled as one of SC Magazine’s ‘Best Buys’. Stating no possible negative points against the solution, the overall verdict deemed MOVEit DMZ a “A flexible, web-based product which allows tight control over end-to-end file transfer security.”Ipswitch MOVEit SC Magazine Review

See here for full details of the SC Magazine review or for more information regarding the Ipswitch File Transfer product range. Please also feel free to contact Pro2col on 0333 123 1240 to speak to one of our consultants.

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Buy WS_FTP Products Now and Earn Cash Back…

The 2010 Ipswitch Cash Club program makes the decision to purchase any WS_FTP Server solution much easier by offering you cashback on every purchase!

If you make a qualifying purchase from November 1-30, 2010, you will receive 15% of your total purchase in Amazon.com gift cards.

But the clock is ticking…

  • Purchases made from November 1-30, 2010 will receive 15% of the total purchase in Amazon.com gift cards.
  • Purchases made from December 1-31, 2010 will receive 10% of the total purchase in Amazon.com gift cards.

Money Savings

Beat the clock! If you were already considering WS_FTP Professional multi-packs, WS_FTP Server, or one of the powerful WS_FTP Server modules, act now to get the most cash back.

You can get in contact with the team at Pro2col on 0333 123 1240 to find out more.

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How will the changes to PCI DSS affect you?

The PCI Security Standards Council have just released version 2.0 of PCI DSS, the Data Security Standard enforced upon all merchants that accept any form of card payments, designed to secure and protect cardholder details.  Although introducing only minor alterations, the main intention of the amendment is to provide greater clarity and flexibility for small merchants, facilitating a more comprehensive understanding of the requirements that must be satisfied under PCI DSS and making them easier to implement and abide by.

From a long term perspective, the amendments made are designed to help merchants manage evolving risks and data security threats whilst maintaining alignment with industry best practices.  Taking a higher level perspective, the main changes cover:

  • Reinforcement of the need to conduct thorough scoping exercises, so that merchants can identify exactly where their cardholder data resides in the business.
  • The need for more effective log management of credit card data within the business.
  • Allowance for organisations to adopt a more risk based approach when prioritising vulnerabilities, taking into account their specific circumstances.
  • The acceptance of unique business environments and accommodation of their specific needs.

More specifically Jonathan Lampe, VP of Product Management at Ipswitch File Transfer and representative of the PCI Security Council has identified the 5 key changes that will directly effect the transfer of sensitive credit card data:

  • Explicit recognition of SFTP  as a secure protocol.
  • Audit of virtual machine infrastructure and virtualisation hypervisors will be brought within the scope of PCI DSS.
  • Rotation requirements for the purposes of key management will be “based on industry best practices and guidelines” rather than an annual stipulation.
  • Identity and authentication requirements for users, “non-consumers” and administrators will be split further.
  • More specific requirements will be implemented around the auditability and security of timekeeping, especially as recorded in audit logs.  (Coordinated and reliable timestamps are helpful during civil and criminal investigations as well as internal forensics investigations.)

A further step taken by the PCI council to help small merchants achieve the latest 2.0 PCI DSS changes is the introduction of a small microsite.  The implementation life-cycle the of PCI Council’s standards will be extended from the current 2 years to 3 years to give merchants plenty of time to make the necessary changes.  The new 2.0 standard will be effective from 1st January 2011, however validation against the previous 1.2.1 standard will be allowed until 31st December 2011.

For more information regarding PCI DSS compliance and how this can be achieve in terms of secure file transfer, please don’t hesitate to contact the team at Pro2col on 0333 123 1240.

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Data: Transferring the Burden Under PCI DSS

GT News have just published a great article written by Jonathan Lampe (Vice President of Product Management at Ipswitch) regarding data transfer requirements under PCI DSS.  If anyone is looking for a PCI DSS compliant solution for file transferring data, these are the points they really need to be taking into consideration:

Data: Transferring the Burden Under PCI DSS

Jonathan Lampe, Ipswitch – 08 Jun 2010

Despite widespread adoption of Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) and transaction sets in the financial industry, a surprising high percentage of the data flow is still represented by files or bulk data sets. In 2009, Gartner determined that bulk data transfers comprise around 80% of all traffic. This is probably a surprise if your company is among the many with millions invested in just managing individual transactions – but there are good management and security reasons for this continuing situation.

Why is File Transfer Still Common?

Financial institutions and item processors are still ‘FTP’ing’ (file transfer protocol), emailing, or sending and sharing files instead of transactions for a number of reasons. First, it helps hide the complexity of systems on both ends – there is no reliance and concern regarding libraries of transactions and responses related to one system and a different set related to another system. Second, it reduces the risk of transmission failure and makes it less risky for employees to send a small number of files or bulk data sets rather than a large number of transactions. Finally, it also increases the reliability of an overall operation.

The Managed File Transfer Industry

The managed file transfer (MFT) industry is comprised of providers whose solutions manage and protect these bulk data sets as they move between partners, business areas and locations. Collectively they address challenges presented by bulk data transfers and principles-based rules of the sort that have become common over the past few years – for example the Data Protection Principles or International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). Fundamentally, rules that tend to embody real-world outcomes as a standard. So, for example, the reported outcomes of penetration testing depend for certification as much upon the experience of the tester (who may be an employee) as upon the integrity of the network. This is all fine – until your network meets the real world. Principles-based rules tend to put the onus squarely on us to make and maintain systems.

For consumers, consultants and Payment Card Industry (PCI) assessors, this is undoubtedly ‘a good thing’. For those handling card data, the costs of validated and effective compliance represent a potentially significant burden that’s worth passing on to an industry that has quietly got on with the job well before buzzwords, such as ‘cloudsourcing’ or even ‘outsourcing’, entered the lexicon.

Vendors and Technologies Need Evaluation

It therefore makes a great deal of sense to place as much of that onus, and indeed risk and potential liability, on the shoulders of others – suppliers and consultants – as we can. Although PCI Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) can, and does, descend into tick-box detailed level rules in some places – which it makes very good sense to sign off to trusted third parties – nevertheless, significant ongoing parts of our obligations under PCI DSS are essentially management issues. Despite subjective components and PCI requirements to take ongoing account of best practices, the technologies themselves can still be evaluated on a relatively straightforward mechanistic basis, provided that they are submitted to sufficient scrutiny.

At the most basic level, subjective terms such as ‘adequate’ or ‘insecure’ are sometimes to be understood (explicitly or otherwise) as denoting specific technologies or other standards in line with industry best practice and are, therefore, a route to initially evaluating software on a tick-box basis.

Beyond Ticking Boxes – Four Initial Considerations

When evaluating for data security technology in the context of regulated activities, you should look at how four categories – confidentiality, integrity, availability, and auditing – contribute to security and compliance. These headline considerations are designed to assist in assessing whether a data technology or process is likely to provide one-time compliance for the purposes of PCI DSS.

Confidentiality ensures that information can be accessed only by authorised individuals and for approved purposes. For the purposes of PCI DSS this means that employees should have the minimum level of access necessary to do their job. Confidentiality begins with authentication of login credentials on every secure application and starts with putting a strong password policy in place, with robust account expiry procedures and password management.

Integrity, as repeatedly addressed in PCI DSS rules 10, 11 and 12, is relatively under-appreciated and understood solely as a security issue, but is a critical component to compliance. It means ensuring the uncompromised delivery of data, with full Secure Hash Algorithm (SHA)-512 support. In the case of file transfer operations, non-repudiation takes data security to the highest level currently available by adding digital certificate management to secure delivery and data encryption beyond the requirements of PCI DSS. The setting up of alerts is a relatively easy goal – a box ticked on the route to compliance.

Availability is not explicitly addressed in PCI standards but is a critical component of any overall security strategy. It can and should be addressed, if not guaranteed, through load balancing and clustering architectures that support automatic failover and centralised configuration data storage to minimise the chance of a data breach.

Auditing capabilities should be demonstrated by vendors in the form of comprehensive logging and log viewing with tamper evident measures to guarantee the integrity of log files. For technology, security, and other auditing purposes, all client/server interactions and administrative actions should be logged.

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to File Transfer in the PCI DSS Galaxy

The main body of the PCI DSS is divided into 12 requirements.PCI Logo

Section 1 establishes firewall and router configuration standards by requiring all managed file transfer (MFT) vendors to build a product architecture that puts a proxy, gateway or tiered application into a demilitarised zone (DMZ) network segment. This requirement also puts the actual storage of data and any workflows associated with it into internal networks.

The best architectural implementations ensure that no transfer connections are ever initiated from the DMZ network segment to the internal network. Typically this is accomplished using a pool of proprietary, internally established connections. In this way, clients can connect using FTP Secure (FTPS), Secure File Transfer Protocol (SFTP), etc to the DMZ-deployed device, but the transfers involving internal resources are handled between DMZ- and internally-deployed vendor devices by the proprietary protocol.

Section 2 demands that no default or backdoor passwords remain on the system and that systems are hardened. These best practices are generally enforceable with MFT technology, but the best implementations include a hardening utility that also extends protection to the operating system on which the MFT software runs.

Section 3, particularly subsection 3.4, covers encryption of data and storage of keys. To address these issues MFT vendors have an array of synchronous and asynchronous encryption technologies, such as OpenPGP, to ensure data is secured at rest. Cryptography is almost always performed using Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS)-validated modules and secure overwrite of data is commonly used.

Section 4 covers encryption of data in motion. All MFT vendors currently support multiple open technologies such as Secure Socket Layer (SSL), Secure Shell (SSH) and Secure/Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (SMIME) in multiple open protocols, including SFTP, FTPS and Applicability Statement 2 (AS2), to provide this protection.

Section 5 ensures anti-virus (AV) protection is in place for systems and the data that passes through them. Most MFT vendors provide the ability to provide both types of protection with their software. The best allow integration with existing AV implementations and security event and incident management (SEIM) infrastructure.

Section 6 requires secure systems and applications. Most MFT vendors conform to the guidelines here, particularly subsection 6.5 on web application security. However, there are large variations on fidelity to subsection 6.6 in the industry. The best vendors use a battery of security assessment and penetration tools, such as HP WebInspect and protocol fuzzers, to ensure that their software exceeds PCI security requirements – and remains that way from release to release. The best vendors also have multiple security experts working with developers to ensure new features are secure by design. These attributes are not always easy to find on a vendor’s website, but they are critical to the long-term viability of an MFT application – be sure to ask.

Sections 7 and 8 cover the establishment of identity and authority. MFT solutions typically have built-in features that cover these issues from multifactor authentication to sharing of accounts. However, there are two common areas of difference between MFT vendors in these sections. The first is the ability to rapidly ‘de-provision’ users (i.e. disable or delete the account upon termination). The second is the proper storage of passwords: some vendors still use unkeyed hashes or weak Message-Digest algorithm 5 (MD5) hashes, both of which are susceptible to either rainbow table or collision attacks.

Section 9 is about physical access and is one that many software vendors erroneously ignore. However, subsection 9.5 is about off-site backups and is a function that MFT software often provides. One advantage of using an MFT solution for this purpose is that all the security benefits from the MFT solution flow into the backup process as well.

Section 10 is about auditing and visibility into data. MFT vendors also typically have a strong story around these attributes. Common features of MFT include visibility into the full ‘life cycle’ of files, aggregate reporting, detailed logging of every administrative action, and enforcement of specific service level agreements (SLAs). Some MFT solutions also ensure that audit logs and transfer integrity information are tamper-evident to ensure complete non-repudiation of data delivery.

Section 11 is about regular testing of systems and processes. As mentioned above, MFT vendors who perform these types of tests on their own solutions before releasing their software to the public should be sought out and preferred by companies that must adhere to PCI DSS.

Section 12 is about maintaining and enforcing a security policy down to the level of end user training. Like section 9, section 12 is another section many software providers erroneously ignore. However, the best MFT vendors know that providing fingertip reporting and good user experience to both administrators and end users can go a long way toward encouraging proper use of technology.

PCI DSS Appendices A (‘Additional PCI DSS Requirements for Shared Hosting Providers’) and E (‘Attestation of Compliance – Service Providers’) are also often used when managed file transfer services through virtual area network (VAN), software-as-a-service (SaaS), hosted or cloud providers are used. Key requirements here include ensuring that the service provider is not allowing shared users, that different organisations can only see their own logs and that the provider has policies that provide for a timely forensics investigation in the event of a compromise.

Summary

The substance of the PCI burden is an ongoing one. To look down the list of PCI requirements is to scan a list of enjoinders to ‘maintain’, ‘monitor’ and ‘ensure’, that echo the ‘manage, monitor and secure’ objectives of basic FTP technology. However, and, as the March 2008 Hannaford data breach shows, it is possible to be ostensibly compliant – to have ticked all the boxes – and yet not be fully secure.

PCI DSS compliance requires organisations to protect the security, privacy, and confidentiality of information – and to document who accesses the information and the security measures taken to prevent theft, loss, or accidental disclosure.

Click here for further information on the range of products by Ipswitch File Transfer or call Pro2col Sales on 0333 123 1240.

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Ipswitch Acquires MessageWay In Merger Of Managed File Transfer Vendors

Although I was aware of this deal being concluded over a week ago I wasn’t able to let on.  As its now being widely reported online I can confirm that Ipswitch has acquired MessageWay as the managed file transfer marketplace consolidates again after other recent mergers/acquisitions.  Its going to be interesting to see how much more activity between MFT vendors there will be over the coming months.

Here are some further details as penned by Gary Shottes of Ipswitch File Transfer.

Acquisition will pave the way for more secure application-to-application communications, partners say.

Ipswitch Inc., a maker of secure, managed file transfer products and services, today will announce that it has acquired MessageWay Solutions Inc., a provider of managed file transfer and business integration solutions. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

With the addition of MessageWay to its product family, Ipswitch will provide a wide range of secure file transfer services and capabilities, including of advanced analytics, enterprise-wide monitoring, and high-performance data translation and transformation for EDI, ERP, and a variety of other message formats, the companies said.

“When people in the industry talk about security, one of the things that they don’t often mention is that about 30 percent of the exchanges that go on between companies are exchanges of files between applications, not between people sitting at a desk typing at a computer,” says Greg Faubert, president of MessageWay. “This is an area that’s becoming more important all the time.”

“The file transfer market is changing, not only in the volume and size of messages, but in the way they are handled,” says Gary Shottes, president of Ipswitch. “The worlds of managed file transfer, EDI, and middleware, which have typically been handled by different vendors, are converging. We think we’ll be in a position to take market share away from all of those more focused players, by offering solutions that provide a more integrated approach.” The need for managed file transfer is increasing as organizations look for ways to meet industry and regulatory requirements such as SOX, PCI, FISMA, and HIPAA, the executives said. Many enterprises need a better way to show a “chain of custody” on file transfers, proving to auditors that data is safe as it travels between partners.

“What we offer is the ability to exchange files securely through the DMZ without the file ever landing on disk,” Flaubert says. “Companies can submit files or retrieve files through an open protocol, but without the file ever residing in the red zone.

“Once the data gets to its destination, it’s encrypted and housed in a secure database,” Flaubert explains. “The only way for an attacker to get into those files would be for them to have access to the physical disk, all of the encryption keys, and a copy of our software.”

Ipswitch expects its combined offerings to get traction in industries where secure file transfer is required, such as financial services, government, and healthcare.

Click here for further information on the range of products by Ipswitch File Transfer or call Pro2col Sales on 0333 123 1240

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Positive results for Pro2col and co-exhibitors at Infosecurity

We made the decision to attend Infosecurity for the first time this year, with the intent of affirming Pro2col’s position as the UK’s leading supplier and integrator of secure file transfer technologies, with a range of carefully selected products designed to meet the requirements of any business.  Spurred by the formation of partnerships with some of the world’s leading secure file transfer vendors including Aspera, Ipswitch, Data Expedition, Biscom and Stonebranch, we were fortunate enough have experts from two vendors on the Pro2col stand, ready to impart their extensive product knowledge to attendees from around the world.

In customary form, after spending months meticulously planning for Infosec, the days leading up to the show were a little unsettling for us.  With not one but two co-exhibitors traveling from the US to London, nature decided that the pressure of event organisation was not enough and kindly added a humongous ash cloud to the mix – leaving us wondering whether or not half of our stand would actually make the event!

Despite initial concerns over travel arrangements (everyone made it thankfully – even if a little jet lagged), we are excited to say that the show was a great success for all parties involved.  With over 10 years experience within the file transfer arena, we can empathise with how daunting the broad spectrum of solutions in this marketplace can be for businesses when sourcing the most suitable solution for their requirements.  Both resellers and end users alike were very receptive to the impartial file advice and product demonstrations offered by Pro2col representatives, but also pleased to benefit from specialist product information imparted by Jon Laughland – UK Sale Executive for Stonebranch and Charlie Magliato – Channel Manager for Biscom Delivery Server.

From our perspective, it was brilliant to see just how seriously companies are taking the security of their sensitive data.  We spoke to IT professionals from a wide range of market sectors from the public domain (government bodies, healthcare organisations, universities), to retail, publishing, banking, legal firms – the list is endless!  Although unable to give each visitor the time allocated in a typical demonstration or consultation, we were able to glean valuable insight regarding the way businesses are currently moving their sensitive data and provide a neutral recommendation for products to meet their operational needs.

Another factor that surfaced repeatedly during the event, was the financial investment associated with some secure file transfer solutions.  There’s an abundance of smaller companies out there with a requirement to transfer files securely, that just don’t have the budget for a good percentage of the secure file transfer products available.  Similarly, larger corporate organisations don’t want to be paying over the odds for potential solutions.  Pro2col have spent a great deal of time scouring the marketplace to select products that not only cater for all file transfer requirements, but that do so at an affordable cost!

As we are continually looking for ways to improve the services we provide to both existing and potential customers, Infosec was a great learning experience for us in terms of the security marketplace and a productive exercise for the business in terms of relationship building with customers and resellers.

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